Videos and pictures of rare Super Blue Blood Moon Wednesday morning

Wednesday morning, temperatures are hovering in the 40s with low clouds and dense fog in some of our metro counties. South winds overnight have led to a more rapid return of clouds and fog than we had hoped — obscuring the view of the moon in our most populated counties. Folks in the Hill Country will still enjoy mostly clear skies, and Austin may see brief breaks in the clouds.

Viewers are also reporting being able to see the moon from Lake Travis, Lakeway, Spicewood and Cedar Park.

Set your alarm to head out early: Central Texas will get a good show for the rare Super Blue Blood Moon combination on January 31st. In fact, it’s so rare, this trifecta last occurred in the U.S. in 1866!

NASA says: “If you live in the Central time zone, viewing will be better, since the action begins when the Moon is higher in the western sky. At 4:51 a.m. CST the penumbra — or lighter part of Earth’s shadow – will touch the Moon. By about 6:15 a.m. CST the Earth’s reddish shadow will be clearly noticeable on the Moon.”

The Jan. 31 full moon is special for three reasons: it’s the third in a series of “supermoons,” when the Moon is closer to Earth in its orbit — known as perigee — and about 14 percent brighter than usual. It’s also the second full moon of the month, commonly known as a “blue moon.” The super blue moon will pass through Earth’s shadow to give viewers in the right location a total lunar eclipse. While the Moon is in the Earth’s shadow it will take on a reddish tint, known as a “blood moon.”

P = penumbra, U = umbra. Global map showing areas of the world that will experience (weather permitting) the Jan. 31, 2018 “super blue blood moon.” The eclipse will be visible before sunrise on Jan. 31 for those in North America, Alaska and Hawaii. For those in the Middle East, Asia, eastern Russia, Australia and New Zealand, the “super blue blood moon” can be seen during moonrise the morning of the 31st.
Credits: NASA

 

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