Round Rock could lose Quidditch National Tournament if ‘bathroom bill’ passes

Silicon Valley Skrewts' Willis Miles IV, right, leads his team to the quaffles at the center of the field during a scrimmage against the University of Ottawa Quidditch team at the Quidditch World Cup in Kissimmee, Fla., Friday, April 12, 2013. Quidditch is a game born within the pages of Harry Potter novels, but in recent years it's become a real-life sport. The game is a co-ed, full contact sport that combines elements of rugby, dodgeball and Olympic handball. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
Silicon Valley Skrewts' Willis Miles IV, right, leads his team to the quaffles at the center of the field during a scrimmage against the University of Ottawa Quidditch team at the Quidditch World Cup in Kissimmee, Fla., Friday, April 12, 2013. Quidditch is a game born within the pages of Harry Potter novels, but in recent years it's become a real-life sport. The game is a co-ed, full contact sport that combines elements of rugby, dodgeball and Olympic handball. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

ROUND ROCK, Texas (KXAN) — Round Rock is dubbed the “Sports Capital of Texas,” but at least two tournaments are rethinking their visits if the ‘bathroom bill’ passes during special session.

Senate Bill 6 requires transgender people to use the public bathroom that corresponds to their biological sex, not the sex they identify with. Many Republicans have expressed support for the bill, but not Round Rock Mayor Craig Morgan.

“Our Quidditch National Tournament just got announced recently in Round Rock. And they have let us know that although the announcement has been made to come to Round Rock, they’ve put it on hold to wait and see what happens in the special session,” explains Morgan.

Morgan also says a U.S. national women’s collegiate lacrosse tournament wants to come to Round Rock, but they are also waiting to see if the bill passes. Morgan says taxpayers stand to lose if the city loses business.

“Our voters voted to use a half cent sales tax for property tax reduction,” explains Morgan. “So if people aren’t coming to our community, that’s less sales tax to pay down the property tax.”

However, supporters of bathroom regulation say private businesses shouldn’t have to worry. “Look, all we’re doing is protecting privacy, safety and dignity when it comes to intimate facilities in public schools and public buildings,” says Nicole Hudgens with Texas Values. “Private businesses were protected under the SB6 language, we’ll see what happens in the special session.”

Morgan says even the current legislation language is enough to turn people away, which could ultimately mean higher taxes or fewer services. “What is a concern to us, is what hits the pocketbooks of our citizens,” said Morgan. Morgan also says Dell, Round Rock’s largest employer, says it would have problems recruiting employees if bathroom regulations pass.

 

 

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