Texas inmate, on death row for 25 years, gets new life sentence

This undated photo provided by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice shows inmate Robert James Campbell. Campbell, on Texas death row for nearly 25 years for the abduction, rape and slaying of a 20-year-old Houston bank teller is getting his sentence reduced to life in prison after state attorneys told a federal court Wednesday, May 10, 2017, they agreed with the inmate's lawyers that he's mentally impaired, meaning he's ineligible for execution under U.S. Supreme Court rulings. Campbell, 44, will be resentenced to life and be eligible for parole because Texas did not yet have life without parole when he was arrested for the 1991 slaying of Alejandra Rendon. (Texas Department of Criminal Justice via AP)
This undated photo provided by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice shows inmate Robert James Campbell. Campbell, on Texas death row for nearly 25 years for the abduction, rape and slaying of a 20-year-old Houston bank teller is getting his sentence reduced to life in prison after state attorneys told a federal court Wednesday, May 10, 2017, they agreed with the inmate's lawyers that he's mentally impaired, meaning he's ineligible for execution under U.S. Supreme Court rulings. Campbell, 44, will be resentenced to life and be eligible for parole because Texas did not yet have life without parole when he was arrested for the 1991 slaying of Alejandra Rendon. (Texas Department of Criminal Justice via AP)

HOUSTON (AP) — A man condemned nearly 25 years ago for abducting and killing a Houston bank teller is being spared from execution as a judge reduces his sentence to life in prison after prosecutors and his attorneys agreed his mental impairment should keep him from being put to death.

A new sentencing has been set for Tuesday in a state court in Harris County for 44-year-old Robert James Campbell.

Campbell was 18 in January 1991 when authorities say he abducted 20-year-old Alexandra Rendon from a gas station, then raped and fatally shot her.

In 2014, he was within three hours of execution when the punishment was stopped so claims of mental impairment could be investigated. The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled people with mental impairment are ineligible for execution.