Texas doctor who survived Ebola returns to practicing medicine

In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia. On Saturday, July 26, 2014, the North Carolina-based aid organization said Brantly tested positive for the disease and was being treated at a hospital in Monrovia. (AP Photo/Samaritan's Purse)
In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia. On Saturday, July 26, 2014, the North Carolina-based aid organization said Brantly tested positive for the disease and was being treated at a hospital in Monrovia. (AP Photo/Samaritan's Purse)

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — A doctor who survived Ebola after contracting the virus while treating patients in Liberia has quietly returned to practicing medicine in Fort Worth.

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Dr. Kent Brantly returned to practicing medicine about a year ago. He now practices medicine and teaches young doctors at JPS Health Network, where he says some patients recognize him and bring up his battle of more than two years ago.

The 35-year-old was a JPS resident before heading to Africa.

Brantly said his health is fine and he draws on his experience in Liberia to teach the message of caring for others. He says the lesson he’s tried to preach most is “choosing compassion over fear.”

The Ebola outbreak has killed 1,350 people and counting across West Africa. At least 2,473 people have been sickened across West Africa — more than the caseloads of all the previous two-dozen Ebola outbreaks combined.

Ebola is only spread through direct contact with the bodily fluids of sick people experiencing symptoms.

A Dallas nurse also caught the virus while caring for a patient who died of the disease. Nina Pham got a hug from President Barack Obama in the Oval Office at the White House after she walked out of the hospital virus-free. White House spokesman Josh Earnest called the meeting with Obama “an opportunity for the president to thank her for her service.”

Pham thanked her health care teams in Dallas and at the NIH and singled out fellow Ebola survivor Dr. Kent Brantly, who recovered after becoming infected in Liberia, for donating plasma containing Ebola-fighting antibodies as part of her care.