26 percent drop in veteran homelessness in Texas this year

A homeless man rests under a bridge in Austin. (KXAN Photo/File)
A homeless man rests under a bridge in Austin. (KXAN Photo/File)

AUSTIN (KXAN) — Veteran homelessness is down by more than a quarter in Texas, according to new numbers from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The agency, headed by former San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, said there has been a 34.2 percent decline in overall homelessness in the state since 2010. In August, the city of Austin announced they accomplished their task of housing all homeless veterans, after Mayor Steve Adler took the challenge of finding homes for about 200 veterans.

In March, the city found homelessness in Austin had increased by 20 percent, as outreach teams scrambled to find people homes.

Texas saw a 14 percent decline in individuals who experience chronic homelessness this year. Secretary Castro says the number of “doubled up” or rent-burdened families nationwide remains a problem.

“Every person deserves a safe, stable place to call home,” said Castro. “The Obama Administration has made unprecedented progress toward ending homelessness and today marks the seventh straight year of measurable progress.  While we know that our work is far from finished, it’s clear we’re on the right track to prevent and end homelessness for good.”

California is the state with the highest rate of un-sheltered homeless people, followed by Oregon, Hawaii and Nevada. Rhode Island has the nation’s smallest rates, followed by Nebraska and Washington, D.C.

For more information, read the department’s 2016 Annual Homeless Assessment Report. If you’re homeless and need assistance, the city of Austin’s website has a list of resources available to you.

Estimates of homeless people by state, 2016 (Department of Housing and Urban Development)
Estimates of homeless people by state, 2016 (Department of Housing and Urban Development)

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