Rally against the death penalty held at State Capitol

Despite the rain, protesters held a rally Saturday afternoon at the State Capitol calling on State leaders to get rid of the death penalty.

AUSTIN (KXAN) — Despite the rain, protesters held a rally Saturday afternoon at the State Capitol calling on State leaders to get rid of the death penalty.

Terri Been says her brother should not be on death row. Jeff Wood was convicted of capital murder for the 1996 killing of a convenience store clerk in Kerrville.

He did not pull the trigger — and she says he didn’t know his friend would. A federal judge agreed to stay Wood’s execution back in 2008.

“We came within hours of losing him. We said what we thought would be our final goodbyes. And they had to pull me out of the prison screaming for him so it affects us, it affects family members. We’re here to kind of bring attention to that. You know, yes we feel for the victims in the situations but we are victims of the system itself as well,” said Terri.

“The way that the law is worded, it’s very poorly worded. It allows for people like my brother to be railroaded by the system. It said that he should have anticipated a murder, um, is the way that the law, you know, so basically he has to be a mind-reader.”

The killer, Daniel Reneau, was executed in 2002.

The family of Rodney Reed also attended today’s rally.

Rodney was sentenced to die after a jury believed he killed Stacey Stites in 1996. He insists he’s innocent.

Saturday’s rally comes just one day after an attorney says he has new evidence showing Stites’ boyfriend — former police officer Jimmy Fennell — actually killed her and another police officer looked into her death.

“It makes us feel good knowing that there is an investigation going on, it gives us hope. It shows the content of his character. You know, he’s doing 10 years in prison right now,” said Roderick Reed, Rodney’s brother, “We’re very optimistic and hopefully the truth will prevail and justice will prevail.”

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