Gov. Abbott’s week ahead in the Texas Legislature

Texas Attorney General and Republican candidate for governor Greg Abbott waves to the crows before his victory speech Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014, in Austin, Texas. Abbott defeated Democrat Wendy Davis to win the race for Texas governor. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Texas Attorney General and Republican candidate for governor Greg Abbott waves to the crows before his victory speech Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

AUSTIN (KXAN) — This week at the state Capitol, it’s all about new Gov. Greg Abbott. He will deliver his budget and his first State of the State address to lawmakers in the coming days — the first time somebody whose name is not Rick Perry has done so since 2000.

After winning the election by almost 20 points, Abbott has no reason to deviate from his campaign promises. His huge, page-turning policy blueprint still holds all of Abbott’s ideas, and we look at his views on education and transportation.

“There’s more we must do,” Abbott said in his inaugural address.

In his book, Abbott sends clear signals when he talks about education and the importance Pre-K is for the future. He wants to set rigorous standards for teachers and staff as part of his “gold standard” programs where results are more public.

If districts meet the accountability standard, he wants to give them an extra $1,500 per student.

“Our children, transcend politics in this state,” he said during the inauguration.

He hopes an improved half-day Texas Pre-K system will move students off the Federal Government’s Head Start program.

Abbott also focused a campaign ad on the issue of “highway diversions” — or rerouting money from roads to other departments. Abbott’s blueprint keeps highway fund money going to DPS for policing the roads, especially around the border. The rest of the money stays in the Highway Fund, saving the state $400 million a year.

“Taxes raised for roads, will be spent only on building more roads here in Texas,” said the governor.

Both the Senate and the House’s budgets replace the DPS money, keeping an additional $220 million a year on Texas roads. We will learn more about the governor’s emergency items and stances during his State of the State address on Tuesday.

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