Fruit recall serves as food safety reminder

CUTLER, California (AP) — A Central California company has issued a voluntary nationwide recall of specific lots of its fresh peaches, plums, nectarines and pluots over concerns of possible listeria contamination.

Wawona Packing says on its website that no illnesses have been reported and the recall is a precautionary measure. The company said the recalled fruit was packed and shipped to retailers from June 1 through July 12. Retailers that received the fruit include Costco, Walmart, Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s.

The recall came after internal testing at the packing house in Tulare County. Officials say they shut down the lines, retrofitted some equipment and sanitized the facility. Subsequent tests have been negative.

Clovis-based Wawona Frozen Foods is a separate company and is not involved in the voluntary recall.

Listeriosis Complications

Listeria bacteria can cause a dangerous infection called Listeriosis. The Centers for Disease Control says it causes flu-like symptoms including fever, muscle aches, stiffness and gastrointestinal problems.

The bacteria is especially dangerous for pregnant women, leading to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn.

In people with compromised immune systems, Listeriosis can lead to septicemia or meningitis.

Produce Safety Practices

The recall serves as a reminder to use some basic food safety practices:

  • Inspect produce to make sure it is not bruised or damaged.
  • Refrigerate pre-cut produce or surround it with ice.
  • Keep produce (and any other food item) away from raw meat, poultry or seafood to prevent cross-contamination.
  • Wash fruits and vegetables under running water, even if you don’t plan to eat the skin.
  • Scrub items with tough skin, like cucumbers and melons.
  • Dry produce with a clean paper towel to further reduce bacteria.
  • When eating outdoors, pack perishables directly from the refrigerator or freezer into a cooler.
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