Caxirola: the new Vuvuzela of the World Cup

Dilma Rousseff

AUSTIN (KXAN) — First there was the vuvuzela, now there’s the caxirola – the newest World Cup noise-maker that’s already been banned from Brazil’s World Cup stadiums, but it’s still selling like wildfire.

The Caxirola, pronounced cah-she-rolla, was invented by the Oscar-nominated Brazilian composer Carlinhos Brown specifically for the World Cup as a way to avoid the disastrous outcome of the vuvuzela in South Africa. Don’t remember the vuvuzela? Count yourself lucky. One Mother Jones reporter who lived through the South African World Cup describes the noise-maker as an “instrument of torture” alone, or a “swarm of angry bees” in a pack.

Carlinhos BrownThis “new and improved model” has already been certified by the Brazilian Ministry of Sport and FIFA, and it consists of a simple plastic shaker with finger grips. In fact, according to a report from Brazil’s Federal University of Santa Maria it would take 30,000 caxirolas to make the same amount of noise as one vuvuzela.

It’s going for $14 a pop and you can only buy them on FIFA’s official website – available in Brazil’s colors or your country’s own. But don’t pull out your wallets just yet since these noise-makers, despite the official backing, won’t be allowed into the matches.

The Guardian reports you have the caxirola’s “disastrous debut” to blame for that. Angry fans decided to throw their noise-makers onto the field when the match started going sour at a Brazilian national game in April 2013. To the players’ dismay, the caxirola is surprisingly aerodynamic. Plus, local authorities voiced concerns about the potential of using the shaker’s finger grips as brass knuckles. Facing these problems, Brazil’s Ministry of Justice decided to wash their hands clean of the issue and just ban the caxirola all together.

Watch a demonstration of the caxirola in action, directed by inventor Brown, here.

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