LBJ’s teachings shape granddaughter’s life

AUSTIN (KXAN) — In the crowd listening closely to the speakers at the summit is a woman with a personal connection to President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Catherine Robb is the granddaughter of President Johnson. She was only 2 years old when he passed away but she’s relied on his teachings her whole life.

“I really do believe my grandfather would have wanted this to be a place to challenge people to look to the future, to say what are the lessons learned?” Robb said. “How do we take that forward and continue to fight to make sure everyone has equal access to education, and how do we continue on the civil rights struggle?”

Robb also talked about making sure her grandfather’s legacy reaches beyond the walls of the LBJ Library and after the summit is over.

“It’s great,” she said. “It’s a wonderful legacy to have but it’s a lot. It’s a lot to live up to. My grandmother used to talk about sort of paying her rent for her time on earth cause she felt she had been given this wonderful life and she really felt it was her obligation to give back. Fortunately she passed that along to us and instilled the thought to whom much is given much is expected.”

When it comes to President Johnson’s legacy, a lot of the legislation he signed still has an impact on your life.

LBJ’s Social Security Act of 1965 created the Medicare and Medicaid programs. His Higher Education Act that same year increased federal student aid programs for college students. And Johnson signed the Freedom of Information Act which set rules for releasing government documents and data to the public.

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